OpinioN8

Connecting Crouch End and Hornsey with news, views and information

Ally Pally birthplace of TV project stalls - but is there a silver lining?

The AP project found they have not enough cash for the studios bit. This has being publicly admitted to local media. Sources tell me they ran out of dosh to the tune of £9m - the surveyors underestimated the costs.The AP project spin is that the project still within budget and they are just "rescoping" the project to l;eave out the studios! But the media are getting that the studios bit was the USP of the whole thing ...

The silver lining is that there is now a bit of time to for conservatonists to try to persuade them to rethink the costly, unnecessary and in conservation terms, vandalistic planned demolition of the converted arches which literally forms the two studio walls ...

Views: 139

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

The silver lining is that there is now a bit of time to for conservatonists to try to persuade them to rethink the costly, unnecessary and in conservation terms, vandalistic planned demolition of the converted arches which literally forms the two studio walls

I much hope that the opportunity will be taken to reconsider the previous plans, that called for the demolition of the last remaining, original features of the 1936 BBC TV studios.

Admittedly, the bricked-in arches are not pretty, but in my opinion, their historical importance outweighs aesthetic considerations. The building is so large and the facade so long, that restoring symmetry is a needlessly absolutist goal, for a building that is a perfectly indifferent example of Victorian architecture. And thre are ways of minimising the bricked-in appearance, without losing them altogether.

Some time ago, I persuaded the Alexandra Palace Trust Board to have as a goal, the seeking of UNESCO World Heritage site status for the South East wing of Alexandra Palace. The only way to ensure that could not happen, would be to remove the original 1936 studio walls that were formed by the bricking-in (I note, that frustrating that possibility may have been an unspoken previous intention).

Keeping at least the three bricked-in arches outside John Logie Baird's Studio ("B"), would allow for the possibility of re-building a replica of the bizarre-yet-fascinating Intermediate Film Technique apparatus in it's original position.

A standard 1930s movie camera was mounted atop a heavy, immovable film processing laboratory, on the balcony, in a sealed booth. This could be described as a bay-window facing into the large studio. The film camera could pan and tilt, but was otherwise quite inflexible. It marked the end of one approach to televising live studio action, and gave way to a fundamentally superior technology next door, in Studio A: the three EMI-Marconi Emitron cameras, fully independent and all-electronic. It was a huge advance and achievement.

In turn, a retention of these outer wall, together with an IFT-replica, might keep alive the possibility of a UN World Heritage Site status (cultural).

RSS

© 2017   Created by Adrian Essex.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service